Chuck’s Landing to Lake DuBay Dam

Experience the thrill of paddling from Chuck’s Landing to Lake DuBay Dam along the Great Pinery Heritage Waterway. This 14.5-mile scenic segment offers an easy difficulty level, allowing you to immerse yourself in the beauty of the Pinery. This segment of the trail will take approximately 7 1/2 hours to complete. There is plenty of fishing, wildlife spotting, and bird watching opportunities on the Wisconsin River.

Chuck’s Landing to Lake DuBay Dam

Experience the thrill of paddling from Chuck’s Landing to Lake DuBay Dam along the Great Pinery Heritage Waterway. This 14.5-mile scenic segment offers an easy difficulty level, allowing you to immerse yourself in the beauty of the Pinery. This segment of the trail will take approximately 7 1/2 hours to complete. There is plenty of fishing, wildlife spotting, and bird watching opportunities on the Wisconsin River.

Segment vitals

Segment information:
Start: Chuck’s Landing
44.787115, -89.704946

End: Lake DuBay Dam
44.664520, -89.648304
Miles: 183.6 to 199 
Segment length: 14.5 miles

Time required: 7 1/2 hours
Segment difficulty: Easy
Skill level: N/A
Water level: N/A
Gradient: N/A
Trail Type: Scenic

Internet: N/A

Check out the live data

Flow rates

Flow rates play a crucial role in determining the conditions of rivers for canoeing, kayaking, and paddling activities. Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced enthusiast, being informed about flow rates is essential for a safe and enjoyable experience on the water.

Landmarks

Lake Dubay Dam Portage

Mullins Cheese & Whey | Mosinee Facility

St Francis Xavier Catholic Church

Landings

Chuck's Boat Landing

Coordinates: 44.793435, -89.692686

Parking: Yes

Beans Eddy Road Landing

Coordinates: 44.759304, -89.731251

Parking: Yes

Lake Dubay Lions Park

Coordinates: 44.715466 N , -89.679127 W

Accessible dock: Yes

Parking: Yes

Park Road Landing

Coordinates: 44.672325 N, -89.647484 W

Parking: Yes

Lake Dubay Dam Portage

Embark on an adventure at Lake Dubay Dam Portage! Located in Marathon County, this scenic landing provides easy access to the breathtaking waters of Lake Dubay. Whether you’re a seasoned angler or a nature enthusiast, this spot offers the perfect gateway to explore the beauty of the area.

The portage is on the left side of the bank facing downstream

Mileage Marker 190

Portage Length: 704 feet

Takeout coordinates:
Launch Coordinates D°M’S”: 44°40’00.4″N 89°38’56.7″W
Launch Coordinates Degrees: 44.666764, -89.649075

Note: This is a slope down to the river.        

Put-in coordinates:
Launch Coordinates D°M’S”: 44°39’52.3″N 89°38’53.9″W
Launch Coordinates Degrees: 44.664520, -89.648304

Coordinates: 44.664520 N, -89.648304 W

Parking: Yes

History

231 year history of Mosinee

Mosinee has a long and rich history dating from the days of the first French fur trappers, stretching through the logging days, and continuing forward into the future. Mosinee […] trace their settlement all the way back to 1790, when a French trapper named John Lewis DuBay wintered in what is now Knowlton, to the south of Mosinee.

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DuBay and the legacy of the Fur Trade

By the time John Baptiste DuBay made his home in what would become Mosinee, he had already had a long and distinguished career. He had managed the Lac du Flambeau trading post for the American Fur Company, managed a similar post near Fort Winnebago and even operated a small trading post some 11 miles north of Stevens Point, which was widely known as “DuBay.”

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WVIC and harnessing the WI River

Born at the turn of the 19th century, WVIC traces its roots from the heart of the Northwoods, through the boom of the paper and power industry, to the river valley we know today. The WVIC has been the caretaker of water in 21 reservoirs focusing on conservation, flood control, […] and regulation of a uniform flow in the Wisconsin River. Credit: Wausau Pilot & Review

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Chief Mosinee

According to the stories […], in the 1800s Chippewa and Menomonee people would spend part of each year encamped here on the Wisconsin River. The Native Americans had long developed a sort of migratory life going south along the Wisconsin River in the fall to follow the migration of the deer and animals they relied on for food, then back up north in the spring to harvest the sugar bushes.

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The Northerner

In the mid-1800s, steam-powered boats were
making waves as a new way to travel the nation’s larger rivers, such as the Mississippi. It did not take long after the establishment of local communities for enterprising people to try to operate steamers up and down the Wisconsin River.

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The Story of Knowlton

In many ways, the story of Knowlton is a story about the importance of roads. A small group of people settled here on the bend of the Wisconsin River in the mid-1800s. […] its location on the main road made Knowlton an important link in the commerce and community of Central Wisconsin.

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The Portage

For most of the history of humans living along the Wisconsin River, waterways were the main method of travel. Before highways were built, railroads laid down, or even dirt paths
cut through the woods, the Native Americans were navigating the lakes and rivers of the Pinery in birchbark canoes.

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Wildlife

Deer

Wisconsin boasts a robust deer population, with over one million whitetail deer inhabiting diverse landscapes ranging from forests to farmlands. These adaptable creatures are a common sight throughout the state, contributing to Wisconsin’s rich wildlife heritage.

Otter

Wisconsin hosts a growing population of river otters, especially in wetland habitats near lakes and rivers. Recognized for their playful behavior and sleek appearance, otters contribute to the state’s vibrant aquatic ecosystems.

Eagles

Wisconsin boasts a thriving bald eagle population, with over 1,600 breeding pairs. These majestic birds are commonly found near large bodies of water, including lakes and rivers, where they build their nests and contribute to the state’s rich wildlife heritage.

Walleyes

Walleye, a popular sportfish in Wisconsin, thrives in the state’s lakes and rivers, including the Wisconsin River. With a robust population and widespread distribution, anglers enjoy pursuing this prized species, making it a cornerstone of Wisconsin’s freshwater fisheries.

Beavers

Beavers are widespread throughout Wisconsin, especially in areas with abundant water bodies. Their population contributes to shaping ecosystems by creating wetland habitats and altering landscapes, showcasing the ecological importance of these industrious mammals in the state.

Black Bears

Wisconsin is home to a robust population of black bears, estimated at around 24,000. These adaptable mammals are found in a range of habitats, including forests and swamps, showcasing their ability to thrive in diverse ecosystems.

Wildlife

Deer

Wisconsin boasts a robust deer population, with over one million whitetail deer inhabiting diverse landscapes ranging from forests to farmlands. These adaptable creatures are a common sight throughout the state, contributing to Wisconsin’s rich wildlife heritage.

Otter

Wisconsin hosts a growing population of river otters, especially in wetland habitats near lakes and rivers. Recognized for their playful behavior and sleek appearance, otters contribute to the state’s vibrant aquatic ecosystems.

Eagles

Wisconsin boasts a thriving bald eagle population, with over 1,600 breeding pairs. These majestic birds are commonly found near large bodies of water, including lakes and rivers, where they build their nests and contribute to the state’s rich wildlife heritage.

Walleyes

Walleye, a popular sportfish in Wisconsin, thrives in the state’s lakes and rivers, including the Wisconsin River. With a robust population and widespread distribution, anglers enjoy pursuing this prized species, making it a cornerstone of Wisconsin’s freshwater fisheries.

Beavers

Beavers are widespread throughout Wisconsin, especially in areas with abundant water bodies. Their population contributes to shaping ecosystems by creating wetland habitats and altering landscapes, showcasing the ecological importance of these industrious mammals in the state.

Black Bears

Wisconsin is home to a robust population of black bears, estimated at around 24,000. These adaptable mammals are found in a range of habitats, including forests and swamps, showcasing their ability to thrive in diverse ecosystems.

Nearby attractions and activities

Wisconsin Riverwoods Trail

Annie's Sandbar

The Sand Cliffs

Skeeter's Bucket Sandbar

Big Eau Pleine Woods State Natural Area

Lake DuBay Shores Campground

Mullins Cheese & Whey | Mosinee Facility

Sunset Bay Grill

Tiki Beach Bar & Grill

George W. Mead State Wildlife Area

Know Before You Go

Please review these important safety reminders before getting on the water.

Safe & Smart

Check the weather and water temperature before going paddling.

Wear a Lifejacket

Don’t be a statistic.

Know Your Limits

There are old paddlers and bold paddlers, but no old bold paddlers! Know your skill level.

Don’t Drink and Paddle

Water and booze don’t mix.

Have the Right Gear

Footwear, sunscreen, hat, sunglasses, trail map, water, snacks, water tight bag for personal items and your cell phone, bilge pump, and first aid kit.

File a Float Plan

Communicate to family and friends your put-in and take-out, and when you are paddling.

Water Levels & Obstacles

Be aware of water levels, rapids, and dams before you get into the water.

In Case of Emergency Call 911

Remember your mile markers and landmarks.

Have a Map or App

Take a map or download an app to know where you are at on the water. 

No Glass on the Wisconsin River

It is illegal to have glass on the Wisconsin River. If you are caught, the DNR will fine you up to $749.

Know Before You Go

Please review these important safety reminders before getting on the water.

Safe & Smart

Check the weather and water temperature before going paddling.

Wear a Lifejacket

Don’t be a statistic.

Know Your Limits

There are old paddlers and bold paddlers, but no old bold paddlers! Know your skill level.

Don’t Drink and Paddle

Water and booze don’t mix.

Have the Right Gear

Footwear, sunscreen, hat, sunglasses, trail map, water, snacks, water tight bag for personal items and your cell phone, bilge pump, and first aid kit.

File a Float Plan

Communicate to family and friends your put-in and take-out, and when you are paddling.

Water Levels & Obstacles

Be aware of water levels, rapids, and dams before you get into the water.

In Case of Emergency Call 911

Remember your mile markers and landmarks.

Have a Map or App

Take a map or download an app to know where you are at on the water. 

No Glass on the Wisconsin River

It is illegal to have glass on the Wisconsin River. If you are caught, the DNR will fine you up to $749.

Apps

We put together some recomended apps for anyone planning a trip out on the water.

Resources

Check out these resources to help you out when you are planning a trip out on the water.

Apps

We put together some recomended apps for anyone planning a trip out on the water.

Resources

Check out these resources to help you out when you are planning a trip out on the water.

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